Don’t Let Social Distancing Keep You From A Health Check-up

Preventive health care means reactivating those appointments you might have postponed during the months of the Circuit Breaker and social distancing. 

Health screenings, which generally mark our calendars as annual self-care dates, might have taken a backseat this year. 

It’s easy to overlook them, especially with healthcare facilities restricting appointments to emergencies or immediate concerns because of Covid-19 safety measures. 

But indefinitely postponing regular health screening is no long-term solution. Keeping to the confines of your home only reduces the spread of the coronavirus — it doesn’t help you keep track of your body’s needs.

Image Credits: Pexels, Karolina Grabowska

 

Preventive health care means reactivating those appointments you might have postponed during the months of the Circuit Breaker and social distancing. 

Health screenings, which generally mark our calendars as annual self-care dates, might have taken a backseat this year. 

It’s easy to overlook them, especially with healthcare facilities restricting appointments to emergencies or immediate concerns because of Covid-19 safety measures. 

But indefinitely postponing regular health screening is no long-term solution. Keeping to the confines of your home only reduces the spread of the coronavirus — it doesn’t help you keep track of your body’s needs.

Diagnostic tests for general wellness — which for women include breast exams, mammograms, pap smears, pelvic exams, among many others — are essential to preventive healthcare, as well as maintaining optimal health. 

Those of us with family histories of women’s cancers, heart and hereditary diseases also need to stay vigilant. After all, regular checks have been credited with helping women identify markers and early stages of disease, which greatly increase successful treatment. 

The American Cancer Society recommends annual mammograms for women over 40 who are at average risk. 

Those in this category do not have a personal history of breast cancer or a strong family history of the disease. They also do not have a genetic mutation known to increase risk (eg., the BRCA gene), and have not had chest radiation therapy before the age of 30. 

For risk levels higher than average, mammograms and breast MRIs are recommended, starting at the age of 30.

So as the year of the global pandemic winds down, don’t socially distance yourself from your specialist for much longer. Time to make that all-important appointment to catch up with your doctor, and get the assurances you need for a better, healthier year. 

Just what is right for your health screening, and what should you look for? Here are some key factors, depending on which phase of your life you’re at, to consider.

 

Reference:

https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/screening-tests-and-early-detection/american-cancer-society-recommendations-for-the-early-detection-of-breast-cancer.html

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