Dr Lim Min Yu

Obstetrician & Gynaecologist
10 years experience overall
You Don’t Have To Resign Yourself To Lifelong Leakage: Ways To Manage Postpartum Incontinency
As emotionally and physically distressing pregnancy can already be, a pertinent problem that new mothers have to watch out for after childbirth is postpartum incontinence. You may have heard of new moms joking about how they pee their pants after having children. But this issue may be a real problem for some mothers.   Image Source: Shutterstock, molotoka What is Postpartum Incontinence? Postpartum incontinence, also known as urinary incontinence, is the loss of control of one’s bladder after childbirth. This may look like partial or full release urine when one’s bladder is put under stress when exercising, coughing or sneezing. This change in urinary control affects most mother’s after pregnancy, affecting up to half of all new mothers. If you happen to be a new mother and is panicking about the loss of your bladder control, fret not! Postpartum Incontinence is not permanent, and there are ways to manage your postpartum incontinence as your body recovers from it.    What causes Postpartum Incontinence? During pregnancy, the weight of the child puts stress and strain on the muscles of the pelvic floor, which happens to support the bladder. As the baby grows and increases in weight, these muscles weaken over the period of prolonged pressure, causing bladder control to be lost. The ability to contract to hold or stop urine leakage is hence affected, which is why you may experience leaks when you lift something heavy, sneeze, laugh or exercise.   How can we treat Postpartum Incontinence? There are several ways to treat postpartum incontinence, but in certain cases, it may take up to 6 months or longer for a full recovery. However, during this period of recovery, know that there are options that help take your mind off any worries you may have of experiencing another embarrassing leak.   Change your diet To control what goes out, you got to regulate what goes in! If you’d like to minimize any unnecessary stress on your bladder, have a diet that’s kind to it! You can start by staying hydrated, to avoid UTIs and dehydration. Next is load up on fibre-rich fruits and vegetables. Last but most importantly, avoid diuretics like coffee and nicotine! This can help reduce stress on the bladder and help with a smooth recovery.    Try bladder control padsWith bladder control pads, you can say bye to any worries of having involuntary leaks in the public! Bladder control pads are discreet counter-measure supplies that help prevent leaks from causing a mess. Similar to menstrual pads, there are small absorbent pads that are used to absorb urine when a leak occurs. Bladder control pads are changeable and easy to carry around making them a  great solution to wearing bulky briefs.    Perform kegel exercisesOnce you’ve recovered enough to perform light exercises, you might want to try out Kegel Exercise. Kegel exercise can help speed up your recovery from stress incontinence by strengthening your pelvic floor muscles. Kegel exercises can be as simple as squeezing your pelvic muscles and holding them for 10 seconds. But if you’d like to receive more specialised training for your pelvic floor muscles, going to a pelvic floor physical therapist may help! They specialise in help patients recover from pelvic floor disorders, especially prenatal and postpartum.   Above are only a few of many other treatments and devices that can help with your urinary incontinence, but the first recommended step should be to consult a doctor or specialist, so you can take the right steps to regain your bladder control. Your healthcare provider can first rule out the possibility of any serious conditions before the both of you can start developing an effective recovery plan.    References: https://aeroflowurology.com/6-ways-to-successfully-manage-postpartum-incontinence/ https://www.verywellfamily.com/postpartum-incontinence-4580237 https://www.parents.com/pregnancy/my-body/postpartum/urinary-incontinence/
Nectar Editorial
2021-05-06
·
2 mins read
5 Myths About Orgasms You Didn't Know Were False
Take a moment and think about female orgasms. If this makes you feel uncomfortable, you are not alone! This is just one of the many female health topics still shrouded in stigma and taboo. Ladies often have many questions about their sexual wellness but might not be sure where they should begin and just the mere thought of female orgasms probably opens up a wealth of questions. In reality, the female orgasm is not complicated once you understand it but unfortunately there are many misconceptions. Therefore, we hand-picked a few common myths for our doctors, Dr Ida Ismail-Pratt and Dr Lim Min Yu, to debunk and share with you. Before we dive into the various myths surrounding female orgasms, we should define what an orgasm actually is. An orgasm is a feeling of intense pleasure that happens during sexual activity. This feeling is usually accompanied by rhythmic contractions of the genital muscles. During an orgasm, your heart rate will increase, and your brain will release hormones that make you feel happy and content. Now that you know what an orgasm is, here are 5 of the most common myths. {youtube}https://youtu.be/p5XFrYb34pc{/youtube} 1. There is only 1 type of female orgasm. Rather than talking about types of orgasm, we should instead reshape the conversation to the different ways an orgasm can be achieved. There are many different parts of the body which are sensitive to stimulation as they have lots of nerve endings. Stimulating the following areas can result in orgasm: Clitoris Vagina Cervix Nipples Anus Often, it is a combination of these different areas being stimulated that result in an orgasm. It is also important to note that there are erogenous zones specific to each lady. 2. Good sex means you and your partner both have had an orgasm. Having an orgasm is an incredible sensation, but it should not be the singular goal of sex. Having sex can still be a satisfying and relaxing experience regardless of whether it results in orgasms. Sex is not just about pleasure but also about connection between you and your partner. Orgasms can just be seen as a lovely byproduct. 3. You need an orgasm to get pregnant. This is true for the male. He needs to ejaculate, which is part of the male orgasm, in order for the lady to become pregnant. However, for ladies, it is not a requirement for you to have an orgasm to fall pregnant. However, there are plenty of good reasons to have an orgasm! An orgasm is fun, pleasurable, and an excellent stress buster. However, if you become fixated on having an orgasm, both you and your partner may feel under pressure. This can lead to you having difficulty achieving orgasm, adding frustration to your babymaking. The best way to improve your chances of orgasm during sex is to try and enjoy intimate time with your partner. No goals, no pressured-orgasms, no guilt. If you have an orgasm, that is great but if not, it is okay, too. 4. Everyone orgasms so there is something wrong with me if I do not orgasm. If you cannot or do not orgasm, the most important thing to know is that there is nothing wrong with you. You are no less capable of having a healthy and full sex life. There is a small group of women who are unable to achieve an orgasm and this can be caused by the following factors: Medications such as antidepressants A history of trauma Changes that occur at different life stages (for example menopause, weight loss or gain, stress at work, etc.) Unknown reasons (frustratingly) The good news is that there are things you can do to try and make having an orgasm easier. The first step is to ask yourself some questions and do some homework to figure out what works for you. We all have our own individual quirks, preferences, and abilities in the bedroom, and that’s more than okay. As long as the sex you’re having is consensual and safe, you are doing it right. 5. Orgasms feel the same to everyone. This common misconception is perpetuated by TV shows and movies. They tend to set unrealistic expectations for orgasms, especially in women. The psychological experience of an orgasm can vary, depending on factors such as how aroused or excited you are, whether there are any distractions, or how much pressure you feel to reach orgasm. Even though the same thing is happening to your body physically, the way it feels can be different based on all these factors. Orgasms aren’t always “fireworks” amazing: it might be something as ordinary as, “oh that felt nice”. The experience differs from lady to lady so when you compare notes with your girlfriends, keep this in mind! No two bodies are the same. There’s no shame in discussing female sexual wellness. By debunking some of these common myths, Dr Ida and Dr Lim hope to have made it easier to discuss female sexual wellness. There’s no reason for female orgasms to be considered a taboo topic as they can bring a lot of pleasure into your life! The one key message our doctors hope all ladies remember is that sex is not just about having orgasms and it is perfectly normal not to achieve one. Not all orgasms are the same. It is unrealistic to expect any type of stimulation to elicit the same experience every time. Orgasms are just one of the many important elements of sexual satisfaction. If you have any concerns, you can make an appointment with your gynae, who will be able to help you determine if there is a problem, and if so, what can be done to help. *Content is republished with permission from SMG Women's Health.
Nectar Editorial
2021-05-23
·
4 mins read
Yes, You Can Experience Phantom Kicks After Birth
Fetal kicks are one of the most exciting stages in pregnancy. But this sensation can go on for years after giving birth. Here's why they happen. Image Source: Shutterstock, Africa Studio Fetal kicks are one of the most reassuring stages of pregnancy. Unlike a swollen belly, nausea and other pregnancy symptoms, fetal kicks are that stage where you truly get to connect with your baby and make sure that they're alive and well. Surprisingly, you can still feel a sensation similar to your baby kicking and moving around on the inside for months or even years after giving birth. Phantom kicks are when you feel these baby kicks except there's no baby inside you! Some women experience this sensation long after birth or loss of birth. Although not much research has been done on phantom kicks, according to an online survey done on 197 women, 40% of the surveyed women said they experienced phantom kicks. On average, the women felt phantom kicks for 6.8 years after birth One woman reported feeling them for 28 years! Why do they happen? Although phantom kicks are a widely experienced phenomenon, there’s still no definitive explanation regarding why they happen. However, one possible explanation relates to the fact that as the uterus grows during pregnancy, it’s nerve receptors also increase in growth. Feeling phantom kicks after pregnancy could be due to these nerves firing. A similar situation to phantom kicks is when amputees feel their limbs even after they were removed. It’s like your baby was once a part of you and your brain for some reason still perceives it as if it’s there. Another explanation regarding phantom kicks is that they’re simply gastrointestinal or digestive movements. With all the changes going on in your body while recovering from pregnancy, it’s normal to have heightened awareness. This may cause you to focus too much on otherwise normal feelings such as gases or digestive movements.   Are phantom kicks normal? Phantom kicks usually shouldn’t be a cause of concern but they could affect your postpartum mental health. Not everyone feels the same about phantom kicks. They could make you feel nostalgic but for others, phantom kicks don’t come with such pleasant emotions. A stillbirth is a saddening and heartbreaking experience. And while some mothers might be trying to recover from these experiences, phantom kicks can disrupt this process by aggravating symptoms of anxiety.   If you feel like your phantom kicks aren’t normal or they’re affecting your mental health then book an appointment with your doctor.   References: https://www.parents.com/parenting/moms/healthy-mom/phantom-baby-kicks-are-real-and-this-is-why-they-happen
Nectar Editorial
2021-05-24
·
2 mins read
How Motherhood Affects Your Health: The Good, The Bad and Just The Plain Weird!
There's not a single emotion you won't feel during motherhood. Although it might feel like motherhood is draining you, the health benefits of motherhood are many. Today, we'll look at how motherhood affects your health including the good, the bad and just the plain weird!   Motherhood is filled with joy, sadness and a whole spectrum of emotions! And while this journey can be mentally, emotionally and physically exhausting, it’s filled with many health benefits and risks. It all begins with pregnancy where your body undergoes changes to make way for giving birth to your little one. Simply giving birth can expose you to different health effects exclusive to mothers. Today, we’ll look at the different ways motherhood can affect your health.   Health benefits Lower risk of developing certain cancers This is one of the biggest health benefits of giving birth. Pregnancy has been linked with a lower chance of getting breast cancer. This is probably due to the fact that during pregnancy, menstruation stops which reduces your exposure to certain hormones. Breastfeeding mothers are also less likely to get breast cancer since breastfeeding induces the maturing of breast cells which makes them less likely to become cancerous. Giving birth is also associated with a reduced risk of getting ovarian and endometrial cancer. Increased longevity and better heart health Believe it or not, your kids aren’t killing you. In fact, as a mother, you'll probably live longer than childless women. A 2017 study found that having at least one child is associated with increased longevity. Although the reason behind this isn’t clear it could be explained by the social support associated with having children. According to a study, breastfeeding for at least 12 months is associated with a reduced risk of getting heart disease, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Easier periods Although this is by no means a set rule, some women report having less severe menstrual cramps and overall easier periods after giving birth. But whether this is true for you or not, simply taking a break from periods during pregnancy and breastfeeding is a huge plus anyway!   Health risks Higher stress levels Parenting can be very stressful and draining at times. Juggling responsibilities and parenting can take a toll on one’s health. Mothers report having worse health and more fatigue than childless women. But when work is added to the mix, chronic stress markers can increase by 40% compared to non-working mothers. Parenting is already a stressful full-time job let alone adding work stress to the mix! Pregnancy complications We all know how pregnancy complications can affect a mother's health. Deaths due to pregnancy complications have decreased over the years. But still, pregnancy complications are a real risk with some complications being potentially fatal or causing long-lasting damage.   Weird health effects Mommy brain Although "mommy brain" sounds like a myth it turns out to be a real condition. Forgetfulness is actually common after giving birth. The changes to your body during and after pregnancy also affect your brain causing forgetfulness or "mommy brain".  Bigger feet If you need to go buy new shoes after giving birth then pregnancy might be the reason! Giving birth can slightly increase your foot length and flatten your foot arch. This may be caused by the extra weight mothers gain during pregnancy.  References: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28292784/ https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/jan/27/working-mothers-more-stressed-health https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/257151#1
Nectar Editorial
2021-05-25
·
2 mins read
Is it Possible To Have A Loose Vagina?
There are many claims surrounding vaginal looseness but are any of these claims medically accurate? Image Source: Shutterstock, metamorworks A ‘loose’ vagina has been a term used to shame women for their sex lives. And if you think about it, it doesn’t make sense at all, since it’s not used to shame someone who has lots of sex with a partner, but instead someone who has many sex partners. But is the term ‘loose vagina’ medically accurate to begin with? Can a vagina actually end up being more "loose" and if so what can cause it to get loose? Perhaps you would naturally think of childbirth, but is this actually true? Today, we'll cover everything from whether your vagina can change in some cases and whether these changes are permanent or have any lasting effects on your lifestyle.   A brief look into what makes up your vagina Before we answer the main question, let's look into what makes up your vagina and keeps its form and shape. Your vagina is an elastic muscular canal that's so elastic it can handle stretching to make way for a baby's head before strapping back to its original shape! Pelvic floor muscles keep your uterus, cervix and vagina in place.   Can you experience changes in vaginal tightness? Since the vagina is basically a muscle, it can change its shape and form. When you're aroused, your vagina relaxes to facilitate penetration but when you're no longer aroused, it goes back to its original state. Your vaginal canal is very elastic so sex shouldn't change much since your vagina will probably strap back to its original state when you're done. However, giving birth can lower vaginal tightness although the change isn't that drastic. If a baby is popping out of your vagina it makes sense that your vagina might not return to its original state but these changes aren't that big. Your vagina might also lose a bit of its elasticity after a few births but it's nothing to worry about. Any looseness should go away after a few days of giving birth. Looseness is usually temporary. The vagina is a muscle so it's normal to degrade and change with age. Starting from your 40s, your vagina becomes less elastic, drier and thinner when you experience a drop in estrogen. Another possible reason behind losing elasticity is having weak pelvic floor muscles which hold your vagina and other reproductive parts in place.   What you can do Childbirth and ageing can cause minor vaginal tightness change so it's nothing to fear. Weak pelvic floor muscles can also cause a feeling of vaginal looseness. Try Kegels to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles. If you feel like your looseness is affecting your life in any way then make sure you consult a doctor.   References: https://www.healthline.com/health/womens-health/loose-vagina
Nectar Editorial
2021-05-26
·
2 mins read
No article
There are no articles from this expert.
Unable to load tooltip content.